Convocation at Eastman School of Music, August 2018

Listen again to Guy’s performance of Schumann’s Adagio and Allegro with pianist Chiao-Wen Cheng here

Convocation at Eastman School of Music, August 2018

Listen again to Guy’s performance of Schumann’s Adagio and Allegro with pianist Chiao-Wen Cheng here

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Guy’s summer activities are coming to an end in time for new beginnings ahead

Having recently married, Guy has not only been enjoying some time out this summer but has been to various festivals

Guy’s summer activities are coming to an end in time for new beginnings ahead

Having recently married, Guy has not only been enjoying some time out this summer but has been to various festivals including the BBC Proms, Australian Festival of Chamber Music in Townsville, the Lake District Summer Music Festival performing a recital with Melvyn Tan and is currently at Music by the Sea in Berlin, Maryland in the States. Guy now looks forward to beginning work with his new cello class at Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York whilst balancing his teaching with performances in the UK and Germany ahead.

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The Strad Magazine Masterclass September 2018

Guy discusses his thoughts on Mendelssohn’s Variations Concertantes in this coming months edition of  The Strad. Find out more here

The Strad Magazine Masterclass September 2018

Guy discusses his thoughts on Mendelssohn’s Variations Concertantes in this coming months edition of  The Strad.

Find out more here

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4**** Review in BBC Music Magazine for Tecchler’s Cello recording

4* review of Tecchler’s Cello in February’s edition of BBC Music Magazine, written by Paul Riley. “Immaculate intonation is combined

4**** Review in BBC Music Magazine for Tecchler’s Cello recording

4* review of Tecchler’s Cello in February’s edition of BBC Music Magazine, written by Paul Riley.

“Immaculate intonation is combined with an expressive palette ranging from warm fullness of tone in David Matthews’s Ein Celloleben, an in ingenious historical conspectus, to the spectral, half-whispered trills at the end of Mark Simpson’s Un Regalo, and an interpretive acuity that illuminates the obsessive elements of Bray’s darkly brooding Perseus”.

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Strad Review, Wigmore Hall

“Jennifer Pike and Friends” in January’s edition of The Strad, written by Peter Quantrill “He laid emphasis on the lyric

Strad Review, Wigmore Hall

“Jennifer Pike and Friends” in January’s edition of The Strad, written by Peter Quantrill

“He laid emphasis on the lyric sweep rather than the heroic element of Lutoslawksi’s Grave, before drawing the most refined legato in Chopin’s the introduction and Polonaise Brilliante.”

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3 more reviews for Guy’s recent performance with the BBCSO

Daily Telegraph Review  “Best Concerts in December” After the interval came further rarities in the form of the Two Serious

3 more reviews for Guy’s recent performance with the BBCSO

Daily Telegraph Review  “Best Concerts in December”

After the interval came further rarities in the form of the Two Serious Melodies for cello and orchestra – straightforwardly attractive pieces contemporaneous with the Fifth Symphony and thus dating from the peak of Sibelius’s creativity. Guy Johnston’s cello sang hauntingly in the Cantique, and Oramo brought out the more searching tone of Devotion, akin to Bruch’s Kol Nidrei. Oramo also drew warm, impassioned playing in the First Symphony.

You can read the full review here

Bachtrack Review

Before that we had the two short lyrical interludes for cello and reduced orchestra (no oboes or trumpets) that form the Two Serious Melodies, the first (“Cantique”) pastoral in mood and the second (“Devotion”) more ruminative, played with elegant poise by Guy Johnston.

You can read the full review here

Classical Source Review

Contrast came after the interval with the Two Serious Melodies (1915) in its rarely heard yet more fitting version with cello. The years of the First World War were arduous for Sibelius, who produced numerous shorter pieces while grappling with his Fifth Symphony. Brief as is the present brace, its underlying intensity can hardly be doubted – not least in the way that the eloquent ‘Cantique’ finds a pointed contrast with the sombre ‘Devotion’. Guy Johnston gave these miniatures with thoughtful restraint, their poise never obscuring emotional acuity.

 

You can read the full review here

 

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Listen again to recent BBC Radio 3 broadcast

Listen again to Guy performing two enchanted Sibelius Pieces, Cantique and Devotion, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra/Sakari Oramo at the

Listen again to recent BBC Radio 3 broadcast

Listen again to Guy performing two enchanted Sibelius Pieces, Cantique and Devotion, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra/Sakari Oramo at the Barbican Centre.

Click here

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5 ***** BBCSO/ Oramo Arts Desk Review

Read the review of Guy’s recent performance at the Barbican Centre here

5 ***** BBCSO/ Oramo Arts Desk Review

Read the review of Guy’s recent performance at the Barbican Centre here

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5***** review from St George’s, Bristol (Nov. ‘17)

Read a review here of a special concert in St. George’s, Bristol Elgar Cello Concerto Brandon Hill Chamber Orchestra Michael

5***** review from St George’s, Bristol (Nov. ‘17)

Read a review here of a special concert in St. George’s, Bristol

Elgar Cello Concerto

Brandon Hill Chamber Orchestra

Michael Seal, conductor

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Latest CD review from Planet Hugill

Tecchler’s Cello: Guy Johnston’s birthday present to his cello Labels: cd review Ola Gjeilo, David Matthews, Beethoven, Mark Simpson, Jean-Baptise

Latest CD review from Planet Hugill

Tecchler’s Cello: Guy Johnston’s birthday present to his cello
Labels: cd review

Ola Gjeilo, David Matthews, Beethoven, Mark Simpson, Jean-Baptise Barriere, Charlotte Bray, Respighi; Guy Johnston, Tom Poster, Magnus Johnston, Sheku Kanneh-Mason, Carlo Rissari, Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia; King’s College, Cambridge
Reviewed by Robert Hugill on Oct 20 2017
Star rating: 3.5

For its 300th birthday, Guy Johnston takes his cello on an eclectic musical journey back to its birthplace in Rome

At first sight, the programme of this new CD, on King’s College, Cambridge’s own label, is somewhat eclectic, not to say indigestible; Ola Gjeilo, David Matthews, a Beethoven piano trio, Mark Simpson, Jean-Baptise Barriere, Charlotte Bray and Respighi. The linkage between the works being cellist Guy Johnston, or more specifically Guy’s cello, the Tecchler cello of the title

The CD is arranged as a metaphorical and physical journey from Cambridge to Rome, taking the cello home to the city where it was made 300 years ago. Johnston is joined in the journey by Stephen Cleobury and the Choir of King’s College, Cambridge (Johnston was a chorister at King’s), pianist Tom Poster and Magnus Johnston (recorded at Hatfield House where Poster and Magnus Johnston are Guy Johnston’s regular collaborators in the Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival), cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason (like Guy Johnston, Kanneh-Mason is a BBC Young Musician of the Year, and they recorded at the Royal Academy of Music) and Carlo Rizzari and the Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia (recorded in Rome).

There are also the three new commissions from David Matthews, Mark Simpmson and Charlotte Bray, recorded at the Wigmore Hall.

The journey celebrated the cello’s 300th birthday in 2014, but also perhaps a recognition of Guy Johnston’s acquisition of it in 210 and those who had helped this happen, the Stradivari Trust, Royal Society of Musicians and private contributors.

The journey begins in King’s College Chapel in Cambridge where Guy and his elder brother Magnus, violinist on this disc, were both choristers. Guy Johnston performs Ola Gjeilo’s Serenity with Stephen Cleobury and the choir. It is a slow, richly romantic piece with the singing cello line blending with the choir to create some radiant textures.

Next comes Beethoven’s Piano Trio in D major, Op.70 No.1 ‘Ghost’ with Tom Poster and Magnus Johnston, recorded in the Marble Hall of Hatfield House, where many of the festival concerts take place. The opening movement is carried off with gusto and liveliness, making very engaging listening. The atmospheric second movement, which gives the trio its name, has much fine grained singing tone from violin and cello, and moments of high drama too. Whilst the final movement is engagingly vigorous and lively.

We next move to the Royal Academy of Music, where Guy Johnston and Sheku Kanneh-Mason perform the Sonata for two cellos in G major by the 18th century French composer Jean-Baptise Barriere. The opening ‘Andante’ is all poised elegance, whilst the middle movement ‘Adagio’ lets us appreciate the singing tone from the two duetting cellos, and finally there is the perky and crisply appealing ‘Allegro prestissimo’. This is charming music, not deep but very elegant.

From the Royal Academy of Music we move to the Wigmore Hall for the three new commissions, Guy’s birthday presents for his cello. David Matthew’s Ein Celloleben is very much a dramatic rhapsody, Guy Johnston’s singing tone bringing out the lyricism in this complex piece. Charlotte Bray’s Perseus is intriguing and full of drama, with lots of imaginative detail and a sense of going on a journey. Finally Mark Simpson’s Un Regalo (A Gift) which, starting from an atmospheric opening, works up a real head of steam and becomes a virtuoso tour de force.

Finally, in Rome, we hear Respighi’s Adagio con variazione for cello and orchestra. Originally the slow movement of an unpublished cello concerto from 1902, Respighi returned to it in 1921. The theme is melodically attractive, and again Guy Johnston contributes much singing tone, here making this rather old-fashioned piece (the early 1920s saw RVW’s Fourth Symphony and Walton’s First Symphony) rather engaging.

Though this is the ordering of the pieces in the CD booklet, the disc itself does not present the pieces in this order, we have slightly less of a sense of journey and perhaps more of an attempt to make a more balanced programme.

This is a charming and imaginative CD, beautifully performed by all concerned, though I have to admit that it is not one which I would play repeatedly.

 

Ola Gjeilo – Serenity (O Magnum Mysterium)
David Matthews – Ein Celloleben
Ludwig van Beethoven – Piano Trio in D major Op.70 No. 1’Ghost’
Mark Simpson – un Regalo
Jean-Baptiste Barriere – Sonata No. 4 for Two Cellos in G major
Charlotte Bray – Perseus
Ottorino Respighi – Adagio con varizioni
Guy Johnston (cello)
The Choir of King’s College, Cambridge / Stephen Cleobury
Magnus Johnston (violin)
Tom Poster (piano)
Sheku Kanneh-Mason (cello)
Orchestra dell’Academia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia / Carlo Rizzari
Recorded Marble Hall, Hatfield House 10 May 2016, Chapel of King’s College, Cambridge 22 June 2016, Duke’s Hall, Royal Academy of Music, 22 January 2017, Auditorium della Musica, Roma, 28 January 2017, Wigmore Hall, 1 February 2017
KING’S COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE KGS0026 1CD [75.36]

Available from Amazon.

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5***** Review of Tecchler’s Cello recording in Classical Music Magazine

Tecchler’s Cello Guy Johnston (vc), Sheku Kanneh-Mason (vc); Tom Poster (pf); Magnus Johnston (vn); Choir of King’s College Cambridge/Stephen Cleobury;

5***** Review of Tecchler’s Cello recording in Classical Music Magazine

Tecchler’s Cello Guy Johnston (vc), Sheku Kanneh-Mason (vc); Tom Poster (pf); Magnus Johnston (vn); Choir of King’s College Cambridge/Stephen Cleobury; Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia/Carlo Rizzari
King’s College Cambridge KG50026
★★★★★

This is a lovely idea: the Tecchler of the disc title is Johnston’s David Tecchler cello, which celebrated its 300th birthday in 2014. To mark this occasion Johnston commissioned three new works (by Matthews, Simpson and Bray), which receive their recording premieres.

Himself a former chorister of King’s College, Cambridge, Johnston is joined by them in Ola Gjello’s restrained, ecstatic Serenity. The disc is presented as a journey from Cambridge to Rome (where the luthier Tecchler was based) in several chapters, interspersed with premieres. Matthew’s Ein Celloleben references Straudd, Corelli, Beethoven and Ravel; Johnston offers a stunning tour-de-force. Simpson’s Un Regalo plays brilliantly on the Tecchler’s resonance while Charlotte Bray’s dark Perseus marries cryptogram with cosmic metaphor.

There is a youthful aspect Beethoven’s Ghost Trio, while Johnston and Kanneh-Mason’s performance of Barrière G-Major Sonata is pure joy, played on two Tecchlers. Respighi’s Adagio con variazioni is magnificently lyrical.

Imaginatively conceived and beautifully performed, this disc is a winner.

Colin Clarke

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Guy’s CD featured on British Airways this month

Much to Guy’s surprise during a recent flight on British Airways, Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome is listed on

Guy’s CD featured on British Airways this month

Much to Guy’s surprise during a recent flight on British Airways, Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome is listed on the inflight classical music entertainment channel this month.

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All Music Review – Tecchler’s Cello recording

“Above all, the sound of Johnston’s Tecchler is indeed distinctively rich. A unique release, and a recommended one.” Read Review

All Music Review – Tecchler’s Cello recording

“Above all, the sound of Johnston’s Tecchler is indeed distinctively rich. A unique release, and a recommended one.”

Read Review here

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Arts Desk review of Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome

“It makes a spectacularly rich, warm sound, though you suspect that Johnston could make a dusty tea chest sing like

Arts Desk review of Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome

“It makes a spectacularly rich, warm sound, though you suspect that Johnston could make a dusty tea chest sing like an angel.”

You can read the first review of Guy’s CD here

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Trailer for Guy’s latest CD

This short film capturing our journey to Rome was created by the wonderfully talented Matthew Carkeek at Slipstream Media. It

Trailer for Guy’s latest CD

This short film capturing our journey to Rome was created by the wonderfully talented Matthew Carkeek at Slipstream Media. It was aired at the CD launch event at the Royal Academy of Music and gives you an insight into this unique adventure with Guy’s cello. You can buy the recording now here

 

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New YouTube trailer for Guy’s upcoming CD release (8 September)

Watch a taster here of Guy’s journey from Cambridge to Rome here ahead of the CD release on the 8th September.

New YouTube trailer for Guy’s upcoming CD release (8 September)

Watch a taster here of Guy’s journey from Cambridge to Rome here ahead of the CD release on the 8th September.

 

 

 

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Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival Classical Music Magazine July issue

The HHCMF appears in the July issue of the Classical Music Magazine about budding festivals. I was inspired to create

Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival Classical Music Magazine July issue

The HHCMF appears in the July issue of the Classical Music Magazine about budding festivals.

I was inspired to create the Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival six years ago after returning from the Great Music in Irish Houses series in Ireland. I began to wonder whether a festival in one of the special Houses in Hertfordshire, the county where I grew up, could become a reality and thanks to a serendipitous moment and good timing the HHCMF was born.

Bringing music to the counties outside the main cities seems to be greatly appreciated not only at our budding festival but also at a number of my colleagues and friends festivals. I can think of Nicholas Daniel’s Leicester International Festival, Jamie Walton’s festival in the North Yorkshire Moors, Penny Aide’s 2 Moors Festival, Beatrice Phillips’ festival in Lewes and further afield at Jan Vogler’s festival in Moritzburg outside Dresden and my brothers Navarra Quartet festival in Weesp just outside Amsterdam to name a few. The energy, enthusiasm and commitment of all those who lead these festivals not least to mention the local support make each and every one of these festivals unique and special in their own way. People often say, “We can’t believe you have got these musicians to perform on our doorstep!”

I can’t help think that the work my parents have done in their community of Harpenden, Hertfordshire, establishing a music school there 40 years ago and seeing what an impact it has had on so many generations has undoubtedly influenced me to create something that can make a difference to a community through the giving and sharing of music. Education is something we certainly wish to develop further at our festival.

It is the greatest joy to see people present at the concerts we now curate at Hatfield House and to hear the music begin each year after all the hard work and efforts that go into cultivating a weekend of concerts. There were definitely some bumps in the road early on and learning to be on the other side for a change and understanding all the potentially complex dimensions of organising a festival have been eye opening to say the least.

One day I picked up a book written by Sir Neville Marriner about the early days and consequent years of the Academy of Ancient Music and by chance read about the 3 G’s. Marriner learnt early on that if a board was to be proactive and help make ideas a reality, one has to “Give, Get, or Go!” Quite a direct approach, but in our own way I can quite understand what he was getting at. Creating a board that respect the artistic vision of the festival, having a chairman who helps to focus the budget and keep things on course, an accountant who gives up her time and offers her expertise so generously, and an administrator who makes sure everything is in place and well coordinated is actually quite an operation even for a relatively new festival like ours. It has all taken time, and I learnt the hard way in our 3rd year when we ran up a deficit that we gladly recovered from thanks to a supportive board. It certainly defined a new direction and way of working the following year including a clear understanding of the budget!

We are going into our sixth festival and have had festival themes more recently including Remembrance, which commemorated WW1 with works by composers responding to war followed by a festival Inspired by Bach last year and we are looking forward to a theme of Creation this year. I’m never quite sure how a theme develops, but one thing tends to lead to another and through discussions with artists and imagining what could work well over the course of a weekend things gradually emerge.

Through experience now, we have began to use a structure with concerts in the Old Palace that frame the festival, usually larger orchestral and choral offerings, at the beginning and at the end of the festival and have the more intimate smaller chamber concerts in between with ensembles performing in the Marble Hall and other venues we are discovering within Hatfield House. There is much musical history there that we are trying to reconnect with, including with John Dowland who use to be composer in residence there. Our aim is to revive some of this past tradition by inviting future composers in residence to share new compositions alongside the endless gems of the chamber music repertoire.

We haven’t yet been successful with an ACE application but are fortunate to have growing support from our festival friends and other philanthropic contributors without whom the festival wouldn’t happen. Not having ACE funding does limit our aspirations to some extent, but it also encourages one to work well inside a tight budget. The venues aren’t big enough to make ends meet through ticket sales and so the success of each year is reliant on continued annual support as well as a full crowd at the concerts. Through the fundraising efforts that happen from year to year we manage to entice many wonderful artists to come and perform for our audience. We have had the Sixteen, Kings College Choir, Hertfordshire Chorus, Bach with Angela Hewett, Melvyn Tan with his fortepiano, Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante with Anthony Marwood and Lawrence Power, the Navarra Quartet, Tom Poster, Nicholas Daniel, Sam West reciting Schoenberg’s Ode to Napoleon and many more over the years not to mention and exciting line up for this year’s festival including Ian Bostridge, the Aurora Orchestra and Elias Quartet.

Part of the attraction at Hatfield House is the uniqueness of the spaces including the Marble Hall and Old Palace which lend themselves beautifully to intimate Chamber Music. Whatever the reason for this festival, it was an idea that at first was an experiment but thanks to the goodwill and generosity of the Salisbury’s, the team at Hatfield House and the enthusiastic local support as well as from further afield, we have recently celebrated our 5th anniversary and are greatly looking forward to the next 5 years! Please do come to our next festival 28th September – 1st October
www.hatfieldhousemusicfestival.org.uk

Guy Johnston

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Charlotte Bray talks to Classic FM about her new work for Guy’s recording

Charlotte Bray talks with Classic FM about her latest work, Perseus, recorded on Guy’s CD and being released in September.

Charlotte Bray talks to Classic FM about her new work for Guy’s recording

Charlotte Bray talks with Classic FM about her latest work, Perseus, recorded on Guy’s CD and being released in September. You can read more here

 

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Gramophone Magazine “Artists and their Instruments”

Gramophone – Guy Johnston Feature – Sept17 Artists & Their Instruments Guy Johnston talks about his David Tecchler cello of

Gramophone Magazine “Artists and their Instruments”

Gramophone – Guy Johnston Feature – Sept17
Artists & Their Instruments

Guy Johnston talks about his David Tecchler cello of 1714

“It was around 2010, when I was searching for a new instrument, that I heard about the Tecchler cello through work of mouth. My teacher has played on a Tecchler cello and I loved the sound of it, so I definitely thought it was worth having a look at. It was owned by another player, and he totally understood that I needed space to try it out in chamber, solo and conerto music, and so I had a good amount of time which gave me the confidence and trust that this was potentially the instrument for me.

As instrumentalists, what we’re trying to do is find an instrument that we connect with, that somehow goes through to our soul. I’ve had so much experience in six years through this instrument – like any relationship, it developed over time. The instrument eventually becomes part of you.

I developed a concept of taking the cello, 300 years on, on a journey that celebrated its history, so I travelled with it from Cambridge to Rome, via London.

In Rome I actually stayed in apartments above the old studio where Tecchler would have been working. Not much had changed in that street, the Via dei Leutari – the street of luthiers – and it was a spiritual experience, taking the instrument home all those years later. Throughout that journey we captured recordings, and I commissioned three new pieces.

The piece by Mark Simpson really challenges the player – he creates this dialogue between the lower register and the upper registers, and in the virtuosity and the shape of it I think he does something quite extraordinary. Charlotte Bray’s piece, which uses David Tecchler’s name in the music, is also very original and testing, while David Matthews went more along the lines of a celebration, which is what it’s all about!

It’s such a privilege to play on this cello. I’m only a custodian, but I feel very lucky to have it and to be playing on it”

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Jason Price from Tarisio YouTube video made in Rome during Guy’s recording weekend

You can see a short YouTube video featuring expert Jason Price from Tarisio talking about David Tecchler during Guy’s recording

Jason Price from Tarisio YouTube video made in Rome during Guy’s recording weekend

You can see a short YouTube video featuring expert Jason Price from Tarisio talking about David Tecchler during Guy’s recording with the acclaimed Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome here

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The sixth Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival 28 September – 1st October 2017 Book Now!

The 6th Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival was recently launched at a special concert in the Marble Hall, Hatfield House.

The sixth Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival 28 September – 1st October 2017 Book Now!

The 6th Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival was recently launched at a special concert in the Marble Hall, Hatfield House. You can now see this year’s full programme, “Creation” 28th September – 1st October, by clicking here and watch this recent short YouTube video

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“On the trail of Tecchler” BBC Music Magazine September issue

You can read an article by Helen Wallace about Guy’s journey from Cambridge to Rome in September’s edition of the

“On the trail of Tecchler” BBC Music Magazine September issue

You can read an article by Helen Wallace about Guy’s journey from Cambridge to Rome in September’s edition of the BBC Music Magazine. Look out for a copy here

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Guy on the front cover of the September issue of Strings Magazine

Read an article about Guy’s journey from Cambridge to Rome in September’s issue of the Strings Magazine. You can order

Guy on the front cover of the September issue of Strings Magazine

Read an article about Guy’s journey from Cambridge to Rome in September’s issue of the Strings Magazine. You can order a copy here or go to their app and download the article.

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Chapter 3 – Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome (Royal Academy of Music)

Chapter 3 – Royal Academy of Music Following on from Chapter 2, see and hear Guy in action with the

Chapter 3 – Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome (Royal Academy of Music)

Chapter 3 – Royal Academy of Music

Following on from Chapter 2, see and hear Guy in action with the recent BBC Young Musician of the Year winner, Sheku Kanneh Mason in a performance of Barrière’s Sonata in G for 2 cellos.

You can see a preview behind the scenes in this YouTube video and pre order a copy here

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Chapter 2 – Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome (Hatfield House)

Chapter 2 – Hatfield House Following on from the first Chapter in Kings College Chapel, Guy moves on to Hatfield

Chapter 2 – Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome (Hatfield House)

Chapter 2 – Hatfield House

Following on from the first Chapter in Kings College Chapel, Guy moves on to Hatfield House to record Beethoven’s Ghost trio with his brother, Magnus, and Tom Poster.

You can see a preview here behind the scenes and pre order a copy here

 

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The Times – A relationship with a few strings attached 13.5.17

The Times Newspaper 13.5.17 A relationship with a few strings attached You can read about Guy’s happy engagement story featured

The Times – A relationship with a few strings attached 13.5.17

The Times Newspaper 13.5.17

A relationship with a few strings attached

You can read about Guy’s happy engagement story featured in The Times here

A relationship with a few strings attached, The Times, Saturday 13th May 2016

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Endellion Quartet, Schubert Quintet in C, West Road Concert Hall, Cambridge

Read a review here It was fascinating to watch the quintet’s instrumental ‘conversations’ one with the other, producing the kind

Endellion Quartet, Schubert Quintet in C, West Road Concert Hall, Cambridge

Read a review here

It was fascinating to watch the quintet’s instrumental ‘conversations’ one with the other, producing the kind of musical experience that can only be made possible by a group of people subtly anticipating each other’s thought processes and emotions to play instinctively as one.

This came across in all three performances, but nowhere more so than in this outstanding and flawless combined presentation of Schubert’s demanding masterpiece to which guest soloist, Guy Johnston, lent the unmistakeable depth and warmth so characteristic of his sound.

It was given a deserved ovation from the sold-out concert hall audience happy to have been present at such a memorable conclusion to another of the Endellion’s enjoyable seasons of great chamber music.

 

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New short Video

Watch a new short video here with dramatic views of Kings College Chapel and Cambridge during Guy’s recording with the choir. Ola

New short Video

Watch a new short video here with dramatic views of Kings College Chapel and Cambridge during Guy’s recording with the choir. Ola Gjeilo’s Serenity is now out on Spotify and on iTunes. Future recordings to be released from Hatfield House, the Royal Academy of Music, Wigmore Hall as part of a journey to Rome.

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12/5/17 ****Bachtrack Review Kings Place

Read the Bachtrack review here Russian Romance Including works by Scriabin, Arensky, Rachmaninov, Viardot, Prokofiev and Shostakovich Joan Rodgers, mezzo-soprano

12/5/17 ****Bachtrack Review Kings Place

Read the Bachtrack review here

Russian Romance

Including works by Scriabin, Arensky, Rachmaninov, Viardot, Prokofiev and Shostakovich

Joan Rodgers, mezzo-soprano

Michael Mofidian, bass baritone

Sophie Rosa, violin

Guy Johnston, cello

Sholto Kynoch, piano

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Kings Place Review 12/5/17

Robert Hugill Review Russian Romance Including works by Scriabin, Arensky, Rachmaninov, Viardot, Prokofiev and Shostakovich Joan Rodgers, mezzo-soprano Michael Mofidian, bass

Kings Place Review 12/5/17

Robert Hugill Review

Russian Romance

Including works by Scriabin, Arensky, Rachmaninov, Viardot, Prokofiev and Shostakovich

Joan Rodgers, mezzo-soprano

Michael Mofidian, bass baritone

Sophie Rosa, violin

Guy Johnston, cello

Sholto Kynoch, piano

 

 

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Chapter 1 – Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome (Kings Chapel)

The journey from Cambridge to Rome has been captured in recording. Here’s a taster of the first track and you

Chapter 1 – Tecchler’s Cello: From Cambridge to Rome (Kings Chapel)

The journey from Cambridge to Rome has been captured in recording. Here’s a taster of the first track and you can Pre-Order a CD here including the first track for free!

 

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Strad Magazine feature May 2017

You can read a special article by Charlotte Gardner in the Strad Magazine here

Strad Magazine feature May 2017

You can read a special article by Charlotte Gardner in the Strad Magazine here

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Tarisio Article 26/4/17

Tarisio have just published an article in their latest newsletter about Guy’s journey to Rome. You can read more about

Tarisio Article 26/4/17

Tarisio have just published an article in their latest newsletter about Guy’s journey to Rome. You can read more about this exciting project here

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Haydn Review EUCO/Cambridge

Read a review here of Guy’s recent performance of the Haydn Concerto in C with the European Union Chamber Orchestra.

Haydn Review EUCO/Cambridge

Read a review here of Guy’s recent performance of the Haydn Concerto in C with the European Union Chamber Orchestra.

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Bach Suites in Rome Artsdesk Review 6/2/17

Read the full review here Rather perturbingly, hall and orchestra sounded more comfortably accommodated with each other the following afternoon,

Bach Suites in Rome Artsdesk Review 6/2/17

Read the full review here

Rather perturbingly, hall and orchestra sounded more comfortably accommodated with each other the following afternoon, when I dropped into their recording session with the cellist Guy Johnston. He was in town to tape Respighi for the latest leg of a project (eventually to result in a disc on the King’s College Choir label) tracing the history of his cello, made almost 300 years ago in the Roman workshop of David Tecchler. A stone’s throw from the workshop, he then gave a Sunday-morning recital of the first three solo Bach Suites, at a church nestled in the crook of the Tiber.
The stone walls and handsome murals of the Oratorio del Gonfalone lent their own persuasive context to Johnston’s suggestion that the suites, considered together, trace the birth, death and resurrection of Christ. This was superbly direct Bach playing, tonally spare, unsentimental, with a sense of harmonic progress as plain and decisive as the curve of a Roman arch. By not mining every nugget of tone from the lower strings, he secured a lively speaking quality from the Tecchler: the Third Suite’s Courante gossiped away, before the weak beats of the Minuets were flicked off with a shrug.

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